Expanding higher education to facilitate lifelong learning

This author prods universities to be more active in offering learning opportunities to older citizens.

“Around the world, the proportion of older adults is increasing day by day. These people have much to contribute to the development of society. Therefore, it is important that they have the opportunity to learn on equal terms with the young, and in age-appropriate ways. Their skills and abilities need to be recognized, valued and utilized”

Overall, this book constitutes a searching and wide-ranging exploration of how to expand and transform the role of universities in promoting life-long learning. Needless to say, the reform of higher education goes beyond mere pedagogy and didactics; it is a social process which links teaching and learning to students’ personal life patterns, their social and cultural context, and their chosen discipline.

Read more: http://www.dhakacourier.com.bd/news/Essays/Expanding-higher-education-to-facilitate-lifelong-learning/966

How to continue learning after graduation

This essay addresses 6 ways pharmacists should continue learning:

I firmly believe that overall pharmacy knowledge should increase over time and that your “peak” as a professional, if you are committed to continual learning, should be your last years of practice. There is no reason why you can’t keep up with new drugs, changes in labeling, and other trends after graduation, with pharmacy school faculty members serving as good examples of this.

Being an experienced and knowledgeable professional does not happen by accident, but rather takes time, dedication, and a strategy. Here are some tips to help you in developing your strategy to not only keep up with the profession you worked so hard to enter, but also to excel in your journey of lifelong learning.

Read the 6 ways: https://www.pharmacytimes.com/contributor/alex-evans-pharmd-cgp/2019/01/how-to-continue-learning-after-graduation

Learn Like Kindergarteners

In 1999, on the cusp of a new millennium, MIT professor Mitchel Resnick was on a panel where everyone was asked to pick the most important invention of the last millennium. One person said the printing press, another said the steam engine, and another the computer. Resnick said kindergarten.

From its arrival in the 1830s, he said, kindergarten eschewed the ”broadcast” method of teaching by which teachers disseminated information to students. That style would never fly with five-year-olds. Friedrich Froebel, the German educationalist who invented the “garden for children,” instead offered “a radically new approach to education, fundamentally different from schools that had come before,” said Resnick, a professor of learning research who also heads up the MIT Media Lab’s Lifelong Kindergarten research group.

Read more: https://qz.com/1535315/why-an-mit-professor-says-we-should-all-learn-like-kindergartners-if-we-want-to-succeed/

4th Industrial Revolution

It’s called the “4th Industrial Revolution” and lifelong learning is a key to making it happen.

COUNTRIES face two moving targets in the coming decade which is to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and raise national skill levels in order to survive and thrive in the so-called Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Read more: https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2019/01/455085/lifelong-learning-must-4ir

Lifelong Learning for Massage

Even massage therapists benefit from Lifelong learning. This article notes that ongoing education is motivated by oneself, not by other people.

Biologically, as higher-order, thinking mammals, we possess the innate ability to be lifelong learners, and we also possess the cognitive framework to choose whether we want to learn a particular subject or not.

Read more: https://www.massagemag.com/continuing-education-massage-therapists-114360/