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Community Education goes digital

Robbinsdale Area Schools Community Education had no online classes planned for adults before the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Diane Dickmeyer, the program specialist for adult enrichment and special events. The program administrators quickly moved from an in-person method to online only.

There was a steep learning curve, she said, adding the program relied on the Minnesota Community Education Association for guidance on what would work well. The community education instructors were willing to try something new. Many had never taught online classes, she said.

The program offers many classes and adds more each day, Dickmeyer said. Classes range from yoga, cooking, and art to subjects like setting up revocable trusts.

All classes are live, except for one pre-recorded presentation by Doug Ohman, a Minnesota photographer and historian. Classes are on Zoom and participants are able to ask questions and talk with each other. “You can still interact and still learn something new,” she said.

Read how they did it: https://www.hometownsource.com/sun_sailor/free/robbinsdale-area-schools-community-education-goes-digital/article_87e82c80-9935-11ea-8929-4f6b3a82c487.html

Curiousity the key to learning

Curious minds are active minds, and active minds become smart minds. Curiosity is associated with intelligence, creativity and problem-solving ability. Curious people cultivate interesting and creative environments for themselves as they seek out new experiences and are open to exploring new ideas and possibilities.

Everyone possesses curiosity to some degree, although people will differ according to the depth and strength of their curiosity and their willingness to act on it. In this article, I’ll offer some suggestions to help you become more curious.

Read them: https://www.trainingzone.co.uk/develop/talent/why-the-key-to-lifelong-learning-is-developing-curiosity

Moving Classes Online in COVID-19 Era

Lifelong Learning is the Future of work

If you think disruptive technologies such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and automation only affect lower-skilled workers, not professionals like you, think again.

True, the widespread use of robotics and automation has hit manufacturing workers hard as it forges ahead to put millions in routine, repetitive tasks out of work.

But when an online healthcare platform like China’s Ping An Good Doctor can diagnose more than 2,000 illnesses just through questions and answers and can prescribe medications within one minute, then medical jobs are no longer as secure.

You and your professional jobs, too, can be caught off guard sooner than you think.

Investing in new skills is necessary to cope with rapid technological change. This is where the government should come in. The big question is what is the right thing for the government to do to soften the pangs of disruptive technologies in the workforce?

Air Force uses quarantine to shift online

What started as an idea during a lunch at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., before the COVID-19 outbreak forced many Airmen to work remotely, has become a group of more than 11,000 people coming together online to learn and further their professional development.

The Facebook group “AF Quarantine University” gathers together subject matter experts from inside the Air Force, retirees, and others who provide video lectures on any topic they propose, to help Airmen learn and develop at a time when in-person interactions on base are limited.

“How might we take advantage of the current situation and continue our professional development?” the group’s description states. “This group is meant to bring people together, share best practices, and foster a commitment to lifelong learning.”

Read: https://www.airforcemag.com/airmen-use-coronavirus-quarantine-to-shift-development-online/

Lifelong learning matters more than ever

Now, even while Labour has been enduring necessary though painful soul-searching in our leadership elections, we find ourselves focused on a cruel, existential threat to all of our lives. One that has rightly stopped all the clocks of conventional politics and campaigning. But in that last year of traumas, something remarkable has happened within our party that offers a positive shaft of hope for our country’s recovery after Covid-19.

As part of Labour’s promise for a National Education Service, we launched a Lifelong Learning Commission. In the space of just eight months, it delivered a process that cut through traditional silos in higher and further education and skills. Silos that have left so many behind, along with disastrous government policies, and have produced nearly a million lost adult learners since 2010.

Read: https://labourlist.org/2020/04/lifelong-learning-will-matter-more-than-ever-as-we-look-to-recover-from-covid-19/

Lifelong Learning Is Key to Continued Business Success

By

Over the last couple of years, digital transformation has been a frequent topic in my conversations with CIOs. These CIOs have told me repeatedly a culture that promotes a willingness to learn and relearn is essential for success. So how does lifelong learning enable businesses in the digital era?

https://www.cmswire.com/digital-workplace/lifelong-learning-is-key-to-continued-business-success/

A five-step guide to master the art of lifelong learning

While we run just to stay in place, we are in fact slowly moving backwards; we are becoming obsolete even as we do our best to keep up

But it need not be. Let’s try a different approach. How can we remain relevant by becoming a lifelong learner and mastering the art of it?

gives 5 steps to do that:

  1. Rekindle curiosity
  2. Use the workplace as a playground
  3. View your work as a series of performances
  4. Deliberate practice
  5. Reflect and evolve

Read about those: https://www.livemint.com/opinion/columns/opinion-a-five-step-guide-to-master-the-art-of-lifelong-learning-11582815602580.html

Lifelong Learning is vital

A Tibetan proverb says, “A child without education is like a bird without wings.” There’s the obvious interpretation—an uneducated child can not function to its fullest potential. But it’s worth noting the proverb selects a bird, as opposed to some other object or living thing, to deliver its message. Birds, as symbols, represent freedom, peace, and the human spirit. So, the proverb is about more than living to one’s full potential. It’s about living itself. A child without education is not free.

The United Nation’s fourth sustainable development goal — to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promotes lifelong learning opportunities to all — is not merely important, but vital. To celebrate their commitment, let’s check out some of humanity’s most impressive accomplishments in education over the years.

https://www.good.is/quality-education-and-lifelong-learning-opportunities-are-not-merely-important-but-vital