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4th Industrial Revolution

It’s called the “4th Industrial Revolution” and lifelong learning is a key to making it happen.

COUNTRIES face two moving targets in the coming decade which is to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and raise national skill levels in order to survive and thrive in the so-called Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Read more: https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2019/01/455085/lifelong-learning-must-4ir

Lifelong Learning for Massage

Even massage therapists benefit from Lifelong learning. This article notes that ongoing education is motivated by oneself, not by other people.

Biologically, as higher-order, thinking mammals, we possess the innate ability to be lifelong learners, and we also possess the cognitive framework to choose whether we want to learn a particular subject or not.

Read more: https://www.massagemag.com/continuing-education-massage-therapists-114360/

If we’re serious about lifelong learning

“If we’re serious about lifelong learning and re-framing learning around the creation of new knowledge through action, it will require us to re-think our educational institutions from the ground up,” writes John Hagel. “Rather than pushing content to students who are viewed as passive recipients, we’ll need to embrace a pull-based model that focuses on creating environments for people to discover and pursue their passions and helps them to connect with others who share these passions.”

https://edgeperspectives.typepad.com/edge_perspectives/2018/12/the-threat-and-opportunity-of-lifelong-learning.html

Fixing Kindergarten

Everyone agreed that having a good experience in kindergarten is essential for lifelong learning. They also agreed that the current system doesn’t provide that.

In this article, researcher Christopher Brown interviewed educators and parents about how Kindergarten has changed. The focus has been on making kids ready for school. Instead, “Schools have to be ready for kids.”

Lifelong learning starts in Kindergarten. Is it starting right?

Read: https://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20181224/is-kindergarten-getting-in-way-of-learning

From MOOCS to CELLOS: A new model of learning

Six years ago, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) were unveiled as a potential solution to the “cost-disease” of higher education. They provided access to free educational content from top-rated universities to anyone with an internet connection.

After the initial euphoria, a new model of MOOCs has emerged: well-designed, low-cost, certificate-bearing courses. The main difference? Instead of free statements of accomplishment from MOOCs, learners can now earn an affordable certificate to signal competence in a new skill.

The evolution of this new MOOC model — let’s call it the Credential-Earning, Lifelong Learning Online (CELLO) model — is concurrent with the development of the new reality: Workers can now hold a dozen or more jobs during a working lifetime. Can these workers go back to college every time they transition to a new job? No. 

The need for lifelong learning to sustain one’s career is more important than ever, and these CELLOs serve an increasingly vital purpose in filling the educational gaps between graduation and your next job.

Read The Hill article: https://thehill.com/opinion/education/422338-education-must-meet-the-needs-of-a-flexible-workforce

Why Some Retirees Go Back to School at 65

In the 10 years that Jacob Cohen, 70, has been retired from teaching, he has taken more than 100 courses at the University of North Carolina—Asheville, averaging three or four a semester. One of his favorite classes was about the history of life on earth, taught by a retired biology professor. He’s also taken classes on aging, science and history.

Cohen finds taking classes in retirement to be a challenging way to spend his time. “I always find six or eight (classes) that pique my interest,” Cohen says. “I end up with three or four. I like how I feel when I’m being mentally stimulated.”

Read more from US News: https://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/why-some-retirees-go-back-to-school-at-65

A Year of Learning

2018 was just another year, like any year, according to Denver Bingski D. Daradar in Business World: “It was difficult. But the difficulty, I suspect, was partly caused by our unwillingness, to a greater or lesser degree, to change, our paradigms of the world, learn new things, and acquire new skills and competencies.”

Lifelong learning is essential to operate and grow in the business world. It may be time to revisit old assumptions, to discover new ways of working with new generations.

“May 2019 be a time for new learning, and, beyond a life of survival, be a year of flourishing! Happy New Year!”

Read it all here: https://www.bworldonline.com/the-necessity-of-lifelong-learning/

Lifelong learning strategies in Wales

In Wales, the expression ‘lifelong learning’ is often used as umbrella term for forms of learning which fall outside the school system. However, there is no universally accepted definition of the expression and other terms may also be used, including ‘further education.’ Here are some of what it encompasses:

  • further education
  • adult and community learning
  • apprenticeship policy and delivery
  • youth and adult employability policy and delivery
  • workforce skills development

Learn more…

How change shapes our future

Everything changes but the most constant thing in our world is change itself. Its momentum never ebbs. Change is why we’ve seen the evolution of computers from room-sized machines to devices no bigger than the phone you may be reading this on right now.

Change is not always positive, which is why we need to keep ahead of it. Lifelong learning is a way to do that. Read more…

Work world can benefit from lifelong learning

Disruptive forces can have a profound effect on the labour market where there is a mismatch between the jobs available, the skills required and the expectations (such as remuneration and job requirements) of the workforce, according to the OTC Institute.

Rather than seeing this as an impediment, organizations are seeing this as an opportunity to massage the workplace to better match the workers and skills needed. Read more…