Expanding higher education to facilitate lifelong learning

This author prods universities to be more active in offering learning opportunities to older citizens.

“Around the world, the proportion of older adults is increasing day by day. These people have much to contribute to the development of society. Therefore, it is important that they have the opportunity to learn on equal terms with the young, and in age-appropriate ways. Their skills and abilities need to be recognized, valued and utilized”

Overall, this book constitutes a searching and wide-ranging exploration of how to expand and transform the role of universities in promoting life-long learning. Needless to say, the reform of higher education goes beyond mere pedagogy and didactics; it is a social process which links teaching and learning to students’ personal life patterns, their social and cultural context, and their chosen discipline.

Read more: http://www.dhakacourier.com.bd/news/Essays/Expanding-higher-education-to-facilitate-lifelong-learning/966

Learn Like Kindergarteners

In 1999, on the cusp of a new millennium, MIT professor Mitchel Resnick was on a panel where everyone was asked to pick the most important invention of the last millennium. One person said the printing press, another said the steam engine, and another the computer. Resnick said kindergarten.

From its arrival in the 1830s, he said, kindergarten eschewed the ”broadcast” method of teaching by which teachers disseminated information to students. That style would never fly with five-year-olds. Friedrich Froebel, the German educationalist who invented the “garden for children,” instead offered “a radically new approach to education, fundamentally different from schools that had come before,” said Resnick, a professor of learning research who also heads up the MIT Media Lab’s Lifelong Kindergarten research group.

Read more: https://qz.com/1535315/why-an-mit-professor-says-we-should-all-learn-like-kindergartners-if-we-want-to-succeed/

From MOOCS to CELLOS: A new model of learning

Six years ago, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) were unveiled as a potential solution to the “cost-disease” of higher education. They provided access to free educational content from top-rated universities to anyone with an internet connection.

After the initial euphoria, a new model of MOOCs has emerged: well-designed, low-cost, certificate-bearing courses. The main difference? Instead of free statements of accomplishment from MOOCs, learners can now earn an affordable certificate to signal competence in a new skill.

The evolution of this new MOOC model — let’s call it the Credential-Earning, Lifelong Learning Online (CELLO) model — is concurrent with the development of the new reality: Workers can now hold a dozen or more jobs during a working lifetime. Can these workers go back to college every time they transition to a new job? No. 

The need for lifelong learning to sustain one’s career is more important than ever, and these CELLOs serve an increasingly vital purpose in filling the educational gaps between graduation and your next job.

Read The Hill article: https://thehill.com/opinion/education/422338-education-must-meet-the-needs-of-a-flexible-workforce

Why Some Retirees Go Back to School at 65

In the 10 years that Jacob Cohen, 70, has been retired from teaching, he has taken more than 100 courses at the University of North Carolina—Asheville, averaging three or four a semester. One of his favorite classes was about the history of life on earth, taught by a retired biology professor. He’s also taken classes on aging, science and history.

Cohen finds taking classes in retirement to be a challenging way to spend his time. “I always find six or eight (classes) that pique my interest,” Cohen says. “I end up with three or four. I like how I feel when I’m being mentally stimulated.”

Read more from US News: https://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/why-some-retirees-go-back-to-school-at-65

A Year of Learning

2018 was just another year, like any year, according to Denver Bingski D. Daradar in Business World: “It was difficult. But the difficulty, I suspect, was partly caused by our unwillingness, to a greater or lesser degree, to change, our paradigms of the world, learn new things, and acquire new skills and competencies.”

Lifelong learning is essential to operate and grow in the business world. It may be time to revisit old assumptions, to discover new ways of working with new generations.

“May 2019 be a time for new learning, and, beyond a life of survival, be a year of flourishing! Happy New Year!”

Read it all here: https://www.bworldonline.com/the-necessity-of-lifelong-learning/

How change shapes our future

Everything changes but the most constant thing in our world is change itself. Its momentum never ebbs. Change is why we’ve seen the evolution of computers from room-sized machines to devices no bigger than the phone you may be reading this on right now.

Change is not always positive, which is why we need to keep ahead of it. Lifelong learning is a way to do that. Read more…

Call to action: Adopt a school

Mrs. Rosetta Perry appealed to the audience to Adopt a School, to share in the responsibility for insuring equity in schools. Consider, do schools serving students with greater needs have access to resources, funding, and academic support that effectively serve their needs? Find out more: http://tntribune.com/community/local/nashville/education-in-the-black-community-a-call-to-action-adopt-a-school/

CE Center serves and saves students

“I slipped up and messed up a lot but I’m here now and this school taught me, pushes me to go further than I can,” says Stevie Thomas. “This school brings positivity to my life and change how I act around people and being more professional.”

That’s just one of the comments about a Roosevelt School community education program that for students who can’t find success in a traditional classroom. Read more: https://wrex.com/category/2018/11/19/roosevelt-community-education-center-sees-record-attendance-shifts-in-positive-data/

Netherlands: 1 in 5 adults involved in lifelong learning

In 2017, over 1.7 million people in the Netherlands between the ages of 25 and 65 years participated in a form of adult learning.
That’s because the Dutch government supports ‘lifelong learning’, enabling adults – whether in work or not – to acquire sufficient skills and knowledge to be or remain active in the labour market for the long term. Compared to other EU countries, relatively many adults in the Netherlands participate in learning: over 19 percent in 2017. Only in the Scandinavian countries, this share is even higher. In Sweden, more than three in ten adults engage in education or training, followed by Finland and Denmark. The Netherlands and France complete the top five of countries. Here’s a chart showing comparison:

For more details, visit: https://www.cbs.nl/en-gb/news/2018/47/nearly-1-in-5-adults-in-education-or-training

Are universities hubs for lifelong learning?

Of course, universities are hubs for lifelong learning, it is what they have always been although they would call it something different – research, perhaps? But that is probably not what the concept of “lifelong learning” stands for.

Read opinion from Erasmus Salon: https://www.coimbra-group.eu/erasmus-salon-are-universities-a-hub-for-lifelong-learning/