How education will change to support lifelong learning

A study by the Pew Research Center found 54 percent of working adults believe it was essential to continuously update their skills to be successful in their careers. Why? To keep up with advances in technology that are disrupting industries from automakers to retail. So what changes will support this need and how can higher education help?

Whether our young high school graduates enter a trade school, community college, or university, their degree or certificate will not be the end of their education.

Read more: http://www.mininggazette.com/opinion/columns/2019/03/how-education-will-change-to-support-lifelong-learning/

Learning a lifelong process for principal

Don Pearson of Benton Harbor said being a lifelong learner is one of the most important lessons his parents taught him while he was growing up.

“As a kid, that was part of the culture in the home – learning all the time, reading all the time,” said Pearson, a 1975 Benton Harbor High School graduate. “There was literature everywhere. It’s become a hobby. My father reads constantly, even to this day. He’s 93 years old and that was one of the reasons I retired. He’s still reading. He’s still watching the news. And we still have great, stimulating conversations.”

Read more: https://www.heraldpalladium.com/news/local/q-a-learning-a-lifelong-process-for-former-principal/article_c649ff71-8494-5247-9db3-5168978df288.html

Listening to Women

Anne-Marie Russell

“Each week we will meet women who had the passion and determination to break barriers and overcome obstacles to become movers and shakers in their own fields,” she says. “These include women who have excelled in classical music, writing, art, film, science, entrepreneurship, media, sports, government policy, biology, and higher education.”

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Ringling College (OLLI at Ringling College) presents “Listening to Women,” a 12-session series featuring women whose innovations and accomplishments are having an impact and influencing lives locally and globally.

Read more: https://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20190225/osher-lifelong-learning-presents-listening-to-women

Passionately Curious: Habits for Lifelong Learning

I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious.- Albert Einstein

Photo by Gaelle Marcel on Unsplash

When decorating my classroom with inspirational quotes, I came upon this doozy of a quote. And I said, “Wait, that’s me!”

For, you see, I am average. I like to learn lots of things. But I only become mediocre at most of the things that I learn. And I don’t mind really.

I don’t think there is anything wrong with being average. I don’t think there is anything wrong with being a “jack of all trades” as my assistant principal once called me.

I might lack a special talent, but I more than make up for it with my insatiable curiosity, for I am a voracious learner.

Read more: https://theascent.pub/passionately-curious-habits-for-lifelong-learning-e46222826ab8

Expanding higher education to facilitate lifelong learning

This author prods universities to be more active in offering learning opportunities to older citizens.

“Around the world, the proportion of older adults is increasing day by day. These people have much to contribute to the development of society. Therefore, it is important that they have the opportunity to learn on equal terms with the young, and in age-appropriate ways. Their skills and abilities need to be recognized, valued and utilized”

Overall, this book constitutes a searching and wide-ranging exploration of how to expand and transform the role of universities in promoting life-long learning. Needless to say, the reform of higher education goes beyond mere pedagogy and didactics; it is a social process which links teaching and learning to students’ personal life patterns, their social and cultural context, and their chosen discipline.

Read more: http://www.dhakacourier.com.bd/news/Essays/Expanding-higher-education-to-facilitate-lifelong-learning/966

4th Industrial Revolution

It’s called the “4th Industrial Revolution” and lifelong learning is a key to making it happen.

COUNTRIES face two moving targets in the coming decade which is to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and raise national skill levels in order to survive and thrive in the so-called Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Read more: https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2019/01/455085/lifelong-learning-must-4ir

Lifelong Learning for Massage

Even massage therapists benefit from Lifelong learning. This article notes that ongoing education is motivated by oneself, not by other people.

Biologically, as higher-order, thinking mammals, we possess the innate ability to be lifelong learners, and we also possess the cognitive framework to choose whether we want to learn a particular subject or not.

Read more: https://www.massagemag.com/continuing-education-massage-therapists-114360/

From MOOCS to CELLOS: A new model of learning

Six years ago, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) were unveiled as a potential solution to the “cost-disease” of higher education. They provided access to free educational content from top-rated universities to anyone with an internet connection.

After the initial euphoria, a new model of MOOCs has emerged: well-designed, low-cost, certificate-bearing courses. The main difference? Instead of free statements of accomplishment from MOOCs, learners can now earn an affordable certificate to signal competence in a new skill.

The evolution of this new MOOC model — let’s call it the Credential-Earning, Lifelong Learning Online (CELLO) model — is concurrent with the development of the new reality: Workers can now hold a dozen or more jobs during a working lifetime. Can these workers go back to college every time they transition to a new job? No. 

The need for lifelong learning to sustain one’s career is more important than ever, and these CELLOs serve an increasingly vital purpose in filling the educational gaps between graduation and your next job.

Read The Hill article: https://thehill.com/opinion/education/422338-education-must-meet-the-needs-of-a-flexible-workforce

Why Some Retirees Go Back to School at 65

In the 10 years that Jacob Cohen, 70, has been retired from teaching, he has taken more than 100 courses at the University of North Carolina—Asheville, averaging three or four a semester. One of his favorite classes was about the history of life on earth, taught by a retired biology professor. He’s also taken classes on aging, science and history.

Cohen finds taking classes in retirement to be a challenging way to spend his time. “I always find six or eight (classes) that pique my interest,” Cohen says. “I end up with three or four. I like how I feel when I’m being mentally stimulated.”

Read more from US News: https://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/why-some-retirees-go-back-to-school-at-65

A Year of Learning

2018 was just another year, like any year, according to Denver Bingski D. Daradar in Business World: “It was difficult. But the difficulty, I suspect, was partly caused by our unwillingness, to a greater or lesser degree, to change, our paradigms of the world, learn new things, and acquire new skills and competencies.”

Lifelong learning is essential to operate and grow in the business world. It may be time to revisit old assumptions, to discover new ways of working with new generations.

“May 2019 be a time for new learning, and, beyond a life of survival, be a year of flourishing! Happy New Year!”

Read it all here: https://www.bworldonline.com/the-necessity-of-lifelong-learning/