Lifelong Learning: It’s Just Not for the “Mature”

Lifelong Learning is NOT just for the young.

“In academia, we often apply the term “lifelong learner” to mature or non-traditional students, but all students should reframe their higher education experience to include explorative, self-directed and self-initiated learning in order to satisfy their interests and remain engaged with learning.

Lifelong learning is self-initiated and self-directed education focused on personal development and fulfillment. Lifelong learning can be formal or informal and occurs within and outside of educational institutions. Lifelong learning happens on a daily basis, through formal education, socialization, trial and error, and/or self-initiated study, and is based on our natural interests, curiosity and personal motivations. The desire to learn must come from ourselves, not someone else. Lifelong learning is ongoing, occurring throughout one’s lifetime.”

Student Growth and Lifelong Learning: It’s Just Not for the “Mature”

OSHER’s Ben Franklin Circle

Called “the perfect fit for OLLI,” OLLI member Diane Senerth has revived an 18th century conversation club and brought it to the 21st century for lifelong learning.

Last fall, the University of Delaware’s Wilmington-based Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) became the first OLLI program in the country to start a Ben Franklin Circle discussion group, modeled after Benjamin Franklin’s 18th century conversation club focused on civility and mutual self-improvement.

The 21st-century version was founded at New York City’s 92nd Street Y, and now boasts over 300 chapters across the U.S.

OLLI member Diane Senerth read about Ben Franklin Circles in a New Yorker article and immediately thought of her fellow lifelong learners. The Ben Franklin Circle Discussion Group at OLLI began meeting as an extracurricular activity in 2019 and continued in 2020 on its path of exploration and discussion of Ben Franklin’s 13 virtues of temperance, silence, order, resolution, frugality, industry, sincerity, justice, moderation, cleanliness, chastity, tranquility and humility.

Read more: https://www.udel.edu/udaily/2020/july/osher-olli-ben-franklin-circle/

Digital response to covid launches learning revolution

One silver lining in the pandemic response is that it proved the validity of using digital platforms to continue learning. This will continue to influence the way education is disseminated, according to Jane Morrison-Ross of The Scotsman.

She lays out the impact it will have on teaching and learning for generations to come: https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/jane-morrison-ross-digital-success-offers-opportunity-launch-lifelong-learning-revolution-2924232

 

Intergenerational Dialogue

A class addressing a timely topic:

Mental health has always been an exceptionally important issue for people of all ages, one that is highlighted during the uncertain times of the COVID-19 pandemic. Does the health care system in America deal adequately with issues of mental health and emotional well-being? When do we reach out for help, to whom can we turn for assistance? How do different societies and cultures deal with these issues? This conversation is intended to address these and other related questions in a way that is engaging and empowering for all.

https://olli.berkeley.edu/words-over-time-intergenerational-dialogue

Educational Shift

Work is changing and lifelong learning is becoming a requirement. In response, educational systems around the world will have to shift both what they teach and how they’re financed.

Work is changing and lifelong learning is becoming a requirement. In response, educational systems around the world will…

Posted by Quartz on Monday, March 2, 2020

Lifelong Learning is the Future of work

If you think disruptive technologies such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and automation only affect lower-skilled workers, not professionals like you, think again.

True, the widespread use of robotics and automation has hit manufacturing workers hard as it forges ahead to put millions in routine, repetitive tasks out of work.

But when an online healthcare platform like China’s Ping An Good Doctor can diagnose more than 2,000 illnesses just through questions and answers and can prescribe medications within one minute, then medical jobs are no longer as secure.

You and your professional jobs, too, can be caught off guard sooner than you think.

Investing in new skills is necessary to cope with rapid technological change. This is where the government should come in. The big question is what is the right thing for the government to do to soften the pangs of disruptive technologies in the workforce?

Lifelong learning matters more than ever

Now, even while Labour has been enduring necessary though painful soul-searching in our leadership elections, we find ourselves focused on a cruel, existential threat to all of our lives. One that has rightly stopped all the clocks of conventional politics and campaigning. But in that last year of traumas, something remarkable has happened within our party that offers a positive shaft of hope for our country’s recovery after Covid-19.

As part of Labour’s promise for a National Education Service, we launched a Lifelong Learning Commission. In the space of just eight months, it delivered a process that cut through traditional silos in higher and further education and skills. Silos that have left so many behind, along with disastrous government policies, and have produced nearly a million lost adult learners since 2010.

Read: https://labourlist.org/2020/04/lifelong-learning-will-matter-more-than-ever-as-we-look-to-recover-from-covid-19/

Lifelong Learning is vital

A Tibetan proverb says, “A child without education is like a bird without wings.” There’s the obvious interpretation—an uneducated child can not function to its fullest potential. But it’s worth noting the proverb selects a bird, as opposed to some other object or living thing, to deliver its message. Birds, as symbols, represent freedom, peace, and the human spirit. So, the proverb is about more than living to one’s full potential. It’s about living itself. A child without education is not free.

The United Nation’s fourth sustainable development goal — to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promotes lifelong learning opportunities to all — is not merely important, but vital. To celebrate their commitment, let’s check out some of humanity’s most impressive accomplishments in education over the years.

https://www.good.is/quality-education-and-lifelong-learning-opportunities-are-not-merely-important-but-vital

You NEED Lifelong Learning

Are you confident there will be a role for you—one that engages you and uses your strengths—in your chosen profession 10 years from now? How comfortable are you with your rate and type of upskilling?

The Education and Learning for the Modern World: CBI/Pearson 2019 Education and Skills Surveyreport offers predictions on employment in 2030. CBI and Pearson Education suggest that, despite rampant talk and fears of humans being replaced by robots in their jobs, only one in five employees are in jobs that are anticipated to shrink in the next 10 years. Ten percent of workers are in jobs that may expand. However, that means that for 70 percent of employees, there is more ambiguity about the future of work and what it will mean for them.

https://www.td.org/magazines/td-magazine/theres-no-contention-people-need-lifelong-learning

Black expert to lead community education

Community Education is more than basket weaving.

Cherina Betters has been named chief of Equity and Access for San Bernardino County Schools. In her new position, she will represent 33 school districts and more than 400,000 students.

Her new duties will include, “working to forge strong relationships with parents and community members, as well as serving as the equity lead to promote positive learning outcomes for all students,” according to the San Bernardino County School Superintendent’s office.

https://www.onmenews.com/post/black-expert-will-lead-community-education-push-that-could-be-statewide-model