Lifelong Learning is the Future of work

If you think disruptive technologies such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and automation only affect lower-skilled workers, not professionals like you, think again.

True, the widespread use of robotics and automation has hit manufacturing workers hard as it forges ahead to put millions in routine, repetitive tasks out of work.

But when an online healthcare platform like China’s Ping An Good Doctor can diagnose more than 2,000 illnesses just through questions and answers and can prescribe medications within one minute, then medical jobs are no longer as secure.

You and your professional jobs, too, can be caught off guard sooner than you think.

Investing in new skills is necessary to cope with rapid technological change. This is where the government should come in. The big question is what is the right thing for the government to do to soften the pangs of disruptive technologies in the workforce?

Lifelong learning matters more than ever

Now, even while Labour has been enduring necessary though painful soul-searching in our leadership elections, we find ourselves focused on a cruel, existential threat to all of our lives. One that has rightly stopped all the clocks of conventional politics and campaigning. But in that last year of traumas, something remarkable has happened within our party that offers a positive shaft of hope for our country’s recovery after Covid-19.

As part of Labour’s promise for a National Education Service, we launched a Lifelong Learning Commission. In the space of just eight months, it delivered a process that cut through traditional silos in higher and further education and skills. Silos that have left so many behind, along with disastrous government policies, and have produced nearly a million lost adult learners since 2010.

Read: https://labourlist.org/2020/04/lifelong-learning-will-matter-more-than-ever-as-we-look-to-recover-from-covid-19/

Lifelong Learning is vital

A Tibetan proverb says, “A child without education is like a bird without wings.” There’s the obvious interpretation—an uneducated child can not function to its fullest potential. But it’s worth noting the proverb selects a bird, as opposed to some other object or living thing, to deliver its message. Birds, as symbols, represent freedom, peace, and the human spirit. So, the proverb is about more than living to one’s full potential. It’s about living itself. A child without education is not free.

The United Nation’s fourth sustainable development goal — to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promotes lifelong learning opportunities to all — is not merely important, but vital. To celebrate their commitment, let’s check out some of humanity’s most impressive accomplishments in education over the years.

https://www.good.is/quality-education-and-lifelong-learning-opportunities-are-not-merely-important-but-vital

You NEED Lifelong Learning

Are you confident there will be a role for you—one that engages you and uses your strengths—in your chosen profession 10 years from now? How comfortable are you with your rate and type of upskilling?

The Education and Learning for the Modern World: CBI/Pearson 2019 Education and Skills Surveyreport offers predictions on employment in 2030. CBI and Pearson Education suggest that, despite rampant talk and fears of humans being replaced by robots in their jobs, only one in five employees are in jobs that are anticipated to shrink in the next 10 years. Ten percent of workers are in jobs that may expand. However, that means that for 70 percent of employees, there is more ambiguity about the future of work and what it will mean for them.

https://www.td.org/magazines/td-magazine/theres-no-contention-people-need-lifelong-learning

Black expert to lead community education

Community Education is more than basket weaving.

Cherina Betters has been named chief of Equity and Access for San Bernardino County Schools. In her new position, she will represent 33 school districts and more than 400,000 students.

Her new duties will include, “working to forge strong relationships with parents and community members, as well as serving as the equity lead to promote positive learning outcomes for all students,” according to the San Bernardino County School Superintendent’s office.

https://www.onmenews.com/post/black-expert-will-lead-community-education-push-that-could-be-statewide-model

Microlearning in the digital age

“With the rise of technology, combined with the explosive growth of social media over the last decade, the concept of personalized mobile learning through bite-sized learning snippets has come to the fore. In addition, in the context of major global challenges such as globalization, digitalization and demographic change, and learning for all, there is an urgent need for a variety of learning opportunities and pathways for lifelong and life-wide learning. The concept of microlearning has been around since about 2000, but what is it and how to make learning in bite-sized form successful, attractive and effective, as it to be just right for me and learning in education, training, achievement and talent development contexts. Micro-learning offers opportunities to incorporate, integrate and personalize cost-effective and meaningful learning and training solutions for each individual in terms of personal, environmental and organizational performance improvement. During this webinar with invited experts in this field there will be opportunities to learn more about the growing field of micro-learning / bite-sized learning snippets and quality for life-ong learning.”

A panel and discussion: http://www.eden-online.org/eden_conference/microlearning-and-quality-for-lifelong-learning-in-the-digital-age/

The Ripple Effect of Lifelong Learning

A middle schooler disassembles her bike to figure out how it works. A graduate student takes a semester abroad so he can gain new perspectives. A team of experienced engineers conducts research that benefits an entire field of science.

They are generations apart, but they all have something in common: the curiosity and self-motivation to learn new things that advance their knowledge and the world around them.

Opinion piece by John M. Timken Jr., Special to The Canton Repository. He gets it.

https://www.indeonline.com/opinion/20200217/opinion-ripple-effect-of-lifelong-learners

Make learning our default mode

How can we make learning our default mode?

According to Holmes, it’s not about amassing random knowledge or memorizing copious amounts of information. It’s about turning what we absorb into strategic action.

“I realized that becoming a master of karate was not about learning 4,000 moves but about doing just a handful of moves 4,000 times.” — Chet Holmes

We’re hearing more and more about the power of “practicing habits” over “setting goals.”

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/343720

Millennials spearhead upskilling

Millennials spearhead upskilling

Millennials see lifelong learning as an integral part of professional development. This is a generation that doesn’t have the time of day for jobs they find unfulfilling or purposeless. A generation that has largely been free to muse over their visions. Perhaps an inclination towards lifelong learning is simply a product of a lifetime of micro-learning, where the only thing between you and your next skill is a YouTube video?

Read why Millennials value happiness and recognize the beneficial impact of lifelong learning on personal growth, relationships and issues in society at large. Might be the revival of the Community Ed model?

https://www.hospitalitynet.org/news/4096654.html

Lifelong learning: Helping seniors stay at home longer?

Many seniors aren’t looking for learning – they are looking for company.

Bay Ridge Connects, a new non-profit outgrowth of a Brooklyn senior center,does just that. Rather than chair yoga and Bingo, newly-retired members find others looking for practical programs and classes to make the most of their retirement.

Read how this may help keep seniors in their homes longer: https://bklyner.com/bay-ridge-connects/