Expanding higher education to facilitate lifelong learning

This author prods universities to be more active in offering learning opportunities to older citizens.

“Around the world, the proportion of older adults is increasing day by day. These people have much to contribute to the development of society. Therefore, it is important that they have the opportunity to learn on equal terms with the young, and in age-appropriate ways. Their skills and abilities need to be recognized, valued and utilized”

Overall, this book constitutes a searching and wide-ranging exploration of how to expand and transform the role of universities in promoting life-long learning. Needless to say, the reform of higher education goes beyond mere pedagogy and didactics; it is a social process which links teaching and learning to students’ personal life patterns, their social and cultural context, and their chosen discipline.

Read more: http://www.dhakacourier.com.bd/news/Essays/Expanding-higher-education-to-facilitate-lifelong-learning/966

How to continue learning after graduation

This essay addresses 6 ways pharmacists should continue learning:

I firmly believe that overall pharmacy knowledge should increase over time and that your “peak” as a professional, if you are committed to continual learning, should be your last years of practice. There is no reason why you can’t keep up with new drugs, changes in labeling, and other trends after graduation, with pharmacy school faculty members serving as good examples of this.

Being an experienced and knowledgeable professional does not happen by accident, but rather takes time, dedication, and a strategy. Here are some tips to help you in developing your strategy to not only keep up with the profession you worked so hard to enter, but also to excel in your journey of lifelong learning.

Read the 6 ways: https://www.pharmacytimes.com/contributor/alex-evans-pharmd-cgp/2019/01/how-to-continue-learning-after-graduation

Learn Like Kindergarteners

In 1999, on the cusp of a new millennium, MIT professor Mitchel Resnick was on a panel where everyone was asked to pick the most important invention of the last millennium. One person said the printing press, another said the steam engine, and another the computer. Resnick said kindergarten.

From its arrival in the 1830s, he said, kindergarten eschewed the ”broadcast” method of teaching by which teachers disseminated information to students. That style would never fly with five-year-olds. Friedrich Froebel, the German educationalist who invented the “garden for children,” instead offered “a radically new approach to education, fundamentally different from schools that had come before,” said Resnick, a professor of learning research who also heads up the MIT Media Lab’s Lifelong Kindergarten research group.

Read more: https://qz.com/1535315/why-an-mit-professor-says-we-should-all-learn-like-kindergartners-if-we-want-to-succeed/

4th Industrial Revolution

It’s called the “4th Industrial Revolution” and lifelong learning is a key to making it happen.

COUNTRIES face two moving targets in the coming decade which is to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and raise national skill levels in order to survive and thrive in the so-called Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Read more: https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2019/01/455085/lifelong-learning-must-4ir

Lifelong Learning for Massage

Even massage therapists benefit from Lifelong learning. This article notes that ongoing education is motivated by oneself, not by other people.

Biologically, as higher-order, thinking mammals, we possess the innate ability to be lifelong learners, and we also possess the cognitive framework to choose whether we want to learn a particular subject or not.

Read more: https://www.massagemag.com/continuing-education-massage-therapists-114360/

If we’re serious about lifelong learning

“If we’re serious about lifelong learning and re-framing learning around the creation of new knowledge through action, it will require us to re-think our educational institutions from the ground up,” writes John Hagel. “Rather than pushing content to students who are viewed as passive recipients, we’ll need to embrace a pull-based model that focuses on creating environments for people to discover and pursue their passions and helps them to connect with others who share these passions.”

https://edgeperspectives.typepad.com/edge_perspectives/2018/12/the-threat-and-opportunity-of-lifelong-learning.html

Fixing Kindergarten

Everyone agreed that having a good experience in kindergarten is essential for lifelong learning. They also agreed that the current system doesn’t provide that.

In this article, researcher Christopher Brown interviewed educators and parents about how Kindergarten has changed. The focus has been on making kids ready for school. Instead, “Schools have to be ready for kids.”

Lifelong learning starts in Kindergarten. Is it starting right?

Read: https://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20181224/is-kindergarten-getting-in-way-of-learning

From MOOCS to CELLOS: A new model of learning

Six years ago, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) were unveiled as a potential solution to the “cost-disease” of higher education. They provided access to free educational content from top-rated universities to anyone with an internet connection.

After the initial euphoria, a new model of MOOCs has emerged: well-designed, low-cost, certificate-bearing courses. The main difference? Instead of free statements of accomplishment from MOOCs, learners can now earn an affordable certificate to signal competence in a new skill.

The evolution of this new MOOC model — let’s call it the Credential-Earning, Lifelong Learning Online (CELLO) model — is concurrent with the development of the new reality: Workers can now hold a dozen or more jobs during a working lifetime. Can these workers go back to college every time they transition to a new job? No. 

The need for lifelong learning to sustain one’s career is more important than ever, and these CELLOs serve an increasingly vital purpose in filling the educational gaps between graduation and your next job.

Read The Hill article: https://thehill.com/opinion/education/422338-education-must-meet-the-needs-of-a-flexible-workforce

Why Some Retirees Go Back to School at 65

In the 10 years that Jacob Cohen, 70, has been retired from teaching, he has taken more than 100 courses at the University of North Carolina—Asheville, averaging three or four a semester. One of his favorite classes was about the history of life on earth, taught by a retired biology professor. He’s also taken classes on aging, science and history.

Cohen finds taking classes in retirement to be a challenging way to spend his time. “I always find six or eight (classes) that pique my interest,” Cohen says. “I end up with three or four. I like how I feel when I’m being mentally stimulated.”

Read more from US News: https://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/why-some-retirees-go-back-to-school-at-65

A Year of Learning

2018 was just another year, like any year, according to Denver Bingski D. Daradar in Business World: “It was difficult. But the difficulty, I suspect, was partly caused by our unwillingness, to a greater or lesser degree, to change, our paradigms of the world, learn new things, and acquire new skills and competencies.”

Lifelong learning is essential to operate and grow in the business world. It may be time to revisit old assumptions, to discover new ways of working with new generations.

“May 2019 be a time for new learning, and, beyond a life of survival, be a year of flourishing! Happy New Year!”

Read it all here: https://www.bworldonline.com/the-necessity-of-lifelong-learning/