The future of education is community

Among the many lessons during the historic year, this year’s annual Condition of Education report from the Rennie Center, a research and policy think tank, highlighted just how much communities rely on their education systems. In addition to basic learning, public schools fill a variety of needs for children like food security, technology access and mental health services.

https://www.wbur.org/edify/2021/01/28/education-collaboration-report

Why you should be on an advisory council

“It’s really about building relationships with the community. It’s about trying to understand the needs of the community, and trying to get those specific needs met.”

The president of a community education council in New York lays out the reasons parents should get involved. Good advice for any council, anywhere.

Why You Should Run For A Seat On Community Education Council – Fellow Parents Tell All

Lifelong learning is value for money

Platforms such as Dedao have mushroomed on the back of a trend of people paying for online content they deem useful or valuable.

“For people looking to hone a particular skill or quality, they long for avenues offering multi-skill courses taught by qualified teachers at reasonable prices,” Cao said. “Most important of all, they want the platform to be stable. The annual speech serves to create that ‘predictable’ image.”

Dedao started out as an obscure media account, where Luo repackaged complex historical, philosophical or economic topics into a daily 60-second voice message and weekly one-hour video lectures. Soon, they all morphed into a comprehensive knowledge-sharing portal where people pay for a torrent of classes, books and offline events.

http://global.chinadaily.com.cn/a/202101/05/WS5ff3bef6a31024ad0baa0732.html

Children are always learning

by Alis Headlam

Children are like plants: they don’t stop growing as long as we feed them with water and nourishment. They, unlike plants, do not stop learning, either. They learn from the constant stimulation that surrounds them in whatever environment they exist. They learn from us even when we think they are not watching or listening.

In light of the pandemic, some people are worried that children are not learning in their remote situations. That’s not possible. Children learn every day no matter where they are. It might not be measurable on tests or in a grading system, but there is lifelong learning occurring every day. Some of it might be helpful. Some of it might be harmful.

New ways to learn

Michelle Weise wants to redesign how we learn. In a nutshell, she thinks that we need to shift our thinking away from this idea that people go through a long period of education when they’re young and then shift to being a worker and no longer need to keep learning. She says to keep up with the way employment is going, people will need to find a way to combine working and learning throughout their lives.

Sounds like lifelong learning to us!

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-12-29-how-to-redesign-our-educational-system-for-lifelong-learning

Lifelong Learning will build post-covid world

Will lifelong learning play a role in rebuilding our post-covid world? Yes, according to The International Labour Organization:

According to the guide, building the capacity and engagement of workers’organizations in skills development and lifelong learning, based on a human-centred approach and International Labour Standards, will help build a ‘better normal’ in the post-COVID-19 World.

Read how: https://moderndiplomacy.eu/2020/11/20/skills-and-lifelong-learning-critical-for-all-workers/

K12 Rebrands Itself as Stride Inc.

Contributing Writer

K12 Inc. — a huge, and often controversial provider of online education — has announced it is rebranding, at the same time it is making a pair of acquisitions that will expand its line of products and services.

The company said its name change, to Stride, Inc., reflects its “continued growth into lifelong learning,” regardless of students’ ages or locations.

Read more here: https://marketbrief.edweek.org/marketplace-k-12/k12-rebrands-stride-inc-announces-two-acquisitions/

Community Education Corner: Teaching your preschoolers from home

We came across this great column with ideas for activities you can do with your child to build their fine motor skills. Especially apt at this time, but also timeless!

Written By: Shannon Matzdorf, Esko Community Education | Dec 3rd 2020 – 12pm.

Fine motor skills involve the use of hands, fingers, wrist, feet and toes.

Fine motor skills also include daily tasks of zipping up zippers, tying shoes or pulling Velcro and buttoning buttons. Preschool aged children should be exposed to the use of pencils, crayons, markers, glue, paint brushes and scissors.

Giving your preschooler the opportunity to handle these challenges on their own is key to fine motor growth and independence. It is important to offer support along the way, but let them do as much as they are able to independently.

Although markers are fun to use and give a nice bright color when working on projects, it is also important to have preschoolers practice writing with other writing tools. Crayons and pencils are important for teaching a tighter grasp. This will encourage the child to use a bit more hand pressure to leave a mark on the page and help them build up hand strength.

Scissors are also a great tool to teach fine motor strength by building up hand muscles when opening and closing while cutting. Scissors also help develop eye-hand coordination, teach how to cross the midline of the body and build attention skills. Children need to focus on where they are cutting while completing a cutting project.

Visit the story: https://www.pinejournal.com/opinion/columns/6784223-Community-Education-Corner-Teaching-your-preschoolers-from-home