Literacy linked to lifelong learning

March was National Literacy Month. Research indicates that children’s literacy skills are strongly linked to the educational level of their parents, especially their mothers. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents start reading out loud to their children from the time they are born.

A large body of research has also shown that children who are exposed to books at a young age go on to have stronger vocabulary skills, higher literacy, pay attention and concentrate better, and are better prepared going into kindergarten.

https://www.unionrecorder.com/opinion/editorial-literacy-linked-to-lifelong-learning/article_6ac9fe90-7b60-11eb-ac3d-17cd7ac21c46.html

What every organization should know about lifelong learning

Students typically finish their formal education somewhere between the ages of 18 and 25 – but learning does not stop when one leaves school. Lifelong learning complements a traditional formal education trajectory and refers to the continuous self-development of an individual and the adoption of new knowledge and skills on an ongoing basis. More importantly, it is also a key component of employee development and business strategies.

https://www.hcamag.com/nz/specialisation/learning-development/what-every-organisation-should-know-about-lifelong-learning/248475

Future of Online Learning

“The first half of 2020 was all about reacting and adapting to the COVID-19 pandemic as quickly as possible,” notes Alex Farrugia, Director of the Directorate. “Now that we’re in 2021, our initial teething issues have long since been ironed out. It’s time to look ahead.”

https://epale.ec.europa.eu/en/blog/whats-next-future-online-learning-maltas-directorate-research-lifelong-learning-and

Build Back Better

The pace of change is the fastest it has ever been and the slowest it is ever going to be. In the face of ever-evolving technology including advances in automation and artificial intelligence, how will today’s businesses adapt to maintain their competitive advantage while becoming more resilient? The answer lies in fostering an environment that promotes and provides lifelong learning opportunities.

Tell us something we don’t know! Read more:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/gradsoflife/2021/03/16/building-back-better-with-upskilling-and-lifelong-learning/?sh=590bd3b7ceb1

The future of education is community

Among the many lessons during the historic year, this year’s annual Condition of Education report from the Rennie Center, a research and policy think tank, highlighted just how much communities rely on their education systems. In addition to basic learning, public schools fill a variety of needs for children like food security, technology access and mental health services.

https://www.wbur.org/edify/2021/01/28/education-collaboration-report

Why you should be on an advisory council

“It’s really about building relationships with the community. It’s about trying to understand the needs of the community, and trying to get those specific needs met.”

The president of a community education council in New York lays out the reasons parents should get involved. Good advice for any council, anywhere.

Why You Should Run For A Seat On Community Education Council – Fellow Parents Tell All

Lifelong learning is value for money

Platforms such as Dedao have mushroomed on the back of a trend of people paying for online content they deem useful or valuable.

“For people looking to hone a particular skill or quality, they long for avenues offering multi-skill courses taught by qualified teachers at reasonable prices,” Cao said. “Most important of all, they want the platform to be stable. The annual speech serves to create that ‘predictable’ image.”

Dedao started out as an obscure media account, where Luo repackaged complex historical, philosophical or economic topics into a daily 60-second voice message and weekly one-hour video lectures. Soon, they all morphed into a comprehensive knowledge-sharing portal where people pay for a torrent of classes, books and offline events.

http://global.chinadaily.com.cn/a/202101/05/WS5ff3bef6a31024ad0baa0732.html

Children are always learning

by Alis Headlam

Children are like plants: they don’t stop growing as long as we feed them with water and nourishment. They, unlike plants, do not stop learning, either. They learn from the constant stimulation that surrounds them in whatever environment they exist. They learn from us even when we think they are not watching or listening.

In light of the pandemic, some people are worried that children are not learning in their remote situations. That’s not possible. Children learn every day no matter where they are. It might not be measurable on tests or in a grading system, but there is lifelong learning occurring every day. Some of it might be helpful. Some of it might be harmful.

New ways to learn

Michelle Weise wants to redesign how we learn. In a nutshell, she thinks that we need to shift our thinking away from this idea that people go through a long period of education when they’re young and then shift to being a worker and no longer need to keep learning. She says to keep up with the way employment is going, people will need to find a way to combine working and learning throughout their lives.

Sounds like lifelong learning to us!

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-12-29-how-to-redesign-our-educational-system-for-lifelong-learning